Featuring experts from

Featured Logos

Number of experts listed:
3448

Visit us on Facebook Visit us on Twitter

Sick bees eat healthier

Wednesday, 7 February 2018

Source: James Cook University

James Cook University scientists have shown that sick bees try to look after themselves by eating healthy food.

Dr Lori Lach, Senior Lecturer at JCU, said the study compared the feeding habits of healthy bees to those infected with the gut parasite Nosema ceranae.

In the study, published recently in the journal Microbial Ecology, the researchers first gave groups of bees different kinds of pollen. They found that sick bees, and not healthy bees, lived longer when they had access to the pollen that was more nutritious, even though it also increased the number of parasites found in their gut.

“The real question then was - when the bees had the opportunity to select their own food, would they choose what was good for them?” said Jade Ferguson, the student who conducted the project for her Honours degree.

The answer was yes. When given the option to forage on artificial flowers with either high quality pollen, lower quality pollen, or sugar water, healthy bees showed no pollen preference. However, twice as many infected bees selected the higher quality pollen than the lower quality pollen.

Nosema ceranae is one of the most widespread parasites of adult honey bees in the world, and a lot of studies have investigated its effects on bee physiology. Ours is the first study we’re aware of to investigate effects on floral choice,” said Dr. Lach.

It is still unclear how the bees distinguish between pollens of different quality. However, the choices bees make will likely affect the native and crop flowers they visit. Flowers vary greatly in the quality of pollen they offer and are often competing for pollinators.  Parasites appear to be one more factor that may influence which flowers are visited.

Contact:

Dr Lori Lach – Note: Dr Lach works at JCU’s Cairns campus.

M: 0416 763 628

P: (07) 4232 1743

E: lori.lach@jcu.edu.au